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The Polished Hoe: A Book Review Print E-mail
Written by Nigel Thomas PhD   
Thursday, 16 August 2012 15:40

On November 5, 2002, Austin Clarke won the Giller Fiction Prize for his latest novel The Polished Hoe. Clarke’s first novel, Survivors of the Crossing, was published in 1964. From the very beginning his work was highly praised, but recognition in Canada eluded him. Not until 1997 and his twentieth book, The Origin of Waves, which won the Rogers Communications Writers’ Trust Award, changed things significantly for him. In 1999, he won the W. O. Mitchell Prize, which is given annually to a Canadian who has produced an outstanding body of work and served as a mentor for other writers. The Question, his novel published in 2000, was shortlisted for the Governor-General Award.

Clarke is the author of some twenty-plus books, including ten novels, several collections of short stories, an autobiography, a culinary memoir, a collection of poems, and several essays on social issues. Half of his novels and about a third of his stories are set in Barbados, sometimes called Bimshire, the name by which Barbadians affectionately call their island.

According to Clarke’s biographer, Stella Algoo-Baksh, Clarke led a penurious existence during the early years of writing. Clarke takes every opportunity he can to let the public know that without the support of his wife Betty during those lean years, his writing career might have foundered. Although at various times, he held positions as lecturer or writer-in-residence at many prestigious universities, and freelanced for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, not to mention his being cultural attaché at the Barbadian embassy in Washington and later director of culture in Barbados, Clarke’s inability to play the institutional game of winking at injustice—racial in Canada and the US, political and social in Barbados—made him an unwelcome presence. Moreover, these positions restricted what he wanted to do most: to write.  At one point he became involved with the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, thinking, naively, he now says, that he could change the system from within. For a few years in the early 1990s he was a refugee court judge.

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Brainwashed: A Book Review Print E-mail
Written by Kam Williams   
Thursday, 02 August 2012 22:12


One of the greatest propaganda campaigns of all time was the masterful marketing of the myth of Black inferiority to justify slavery within a democracy.” The last several centuries still haunt us, and hinder our advancement and achievement.”

- Excerpted from Brainwashed

Ever since the dawn of the nation when the Founding Fathers deliberately rationalized slavery by spreading the big lie that Black people were inferior, African-Americans have suffered from serious self-esteem issues. But why has this phenomenon continued to persist so long past emancipation and the elimination of the Jim Crow system of segregation?

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Black Faces in White Places: Book Review Print E-mail
Written by Dr. Arthur Lewin PhD   
Tuesday, 24 April 2012 14:07

 

Black Faces In White Places is far more than a "how-to succeed in the corporate world" manual for African Americans. It not only explains in great and meaningful detail how to play the game, but how to get downright creative with the game, for your own tremendous benefit. Also, Drs. Randall Pinkett and Jeffrey Robinson provide a brilliant analysis of networking. You may think you know what networks are, and how they work, but after reading Black Faces In White Places, you will see that you do not. If for no other reason, read this book to maximize your professional and personal linkages for mutual benefit to you and your associates.

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Top 20 Books for Spring 2012 Print E-mail

These books are not ranked in any particular order.  Most of these books are available on www.amazon.ca or .com and www.barnesandnoble.com

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White House Diary: Book Review Print E-mail
Written by Kam Williams   
Sunday, 12 June 2011 19:59




“During my four years in the White House, I kept a personal diary by dictating my thoughts and observations several times each day… When dictating entries to my diary… I intertwined my personal opinions and activities with a brief description of the official duties I performed.

Readers should remember that I seldom exercised any restraint on what I dictated, because I did not contemplate the more personal entries ever being made public… Despite a temptation to conceal my errors, misjudgments of people, or lack of foresight, I decided when preparing this book not to revise the original transcript…

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